"Stick to Sports?"

By: KYLE ANTHONY

October 2017

If a professional athlete takes a knee during the national anthem, the detractors make it about the action of taking a knee and not what it meant and why it was done in the first place.  If that athlete took his silent protest off the field…off the court…and organized rallies, etc, would the complainers still say “stick to sports”? Is he/she wrong just because you’re standing and they’re kneeling? What if those same athletes took a knee to protest sexual misconduct in the workplace or at school, etc because some of their wives, daughters, sisters or mothers were rape victims? Would they still be told to suppress their personal beliefs and just play the game? If a mother loses her son because of a violent act stemming from the color of his skin or her daughter falls victim to a sexual predator, and she decides to express her grief productively at a public rally, do you tell her to “go home and stick to being a parent to your other kids”?  How many politicians, sports fans, etc ever said “Trump should stick to being a more presidential POTUS and not engage every personal affront via social media”? Or, to put it simply, stop tweeting every thought and picking twitter fights whenever he doesn’t like something
 
Why are professional athletes regarded as role models until they express themselves publicly outside of their role as an athlete, or when they take a stand for or against something that isn’t always agreed upon by their fans? Shouldn’t you want your kids’ role model(s) to represent what it means to be a well-rounded person as well as an exceptional athlete? It seems to matter more what he/she does on the field or the court than how they conduct themselves in their role as a citizen speaking out against a social injustice.

“Why are professional athletes regarded as role models until they express themselves publicly outside of their role as an athlete, or when they take a stand for or against something that isn’t always agreed upon by their fans?”

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"Don't Price yourself out of an opportunity"

By: KYLE ANTHONY

January 2018

Everyone would love to get paid for doing what they love.  When you’re passionate about something you usually want to not only share it with as many people as possible, but you see true validation when there’s people willing to pay you money for it.  But what if you choose to place a monetary value on what you created and those people suddenly don’t share the same passion for the price as they do for your work?
 
I’ve spoken to MANY up and coming music producers who are in the business of selling their tracks (beats) and virtually all of them prioritize making money from selling their music over giving at least some of it away for the sake of having as many people use it as possible.  Yes, arguably there will always be someone that thinks they should pay less for what they want, while some will think they’re getting a steal considering what they paid for it, but what happens when you’ve placed too high of a dollar amount on your work and you price yourself out of a chance to make a sale?  It’s funny how many “beat-makers” will build a huge catalog of their original work and are fortunate to sell even a small fraction of their music, yet they never work as hard at building relationships with potential customers (ie: recording artists, producers, or even labels).  It’s no surprise how many unknown, up and coming artists are reluctant to buy music to use for their songs while they are also trying to get their foot in the door and their name out there. The operative thought is “If I’m going to be putting my complete songs out there online, (etc) just to gain a following and hope to build a career, why am I paying someone just as unknown as I am for the right to use their music?”
 
When it comes to the unsigned, up and coming artists that are the most likely candidates to use your music in this case, they are probably hustling and trying to build their brand just as you are, and buying tracks from a fellow unestablished music creator probably isn’t going to be economically solid option for them. The simple truth is that as long as you are your own biggest fan and few people outside your inner circle are familiar with you and your work, you can’t expect someone else to pay you for the music you create unless they have deep pockets and don’t mind taking a risk on you.  After all, no one can guarantee they’ll have a hit record using your music or anyone else’s.  Copyright your work and be willing to give it away just to get the public familiar with your name, and people will know your name and admire your work, hopefully enough to pay you for it.

“The simple truth is that as long as you are your own biggest fan and few people outside your inner circle are familiar with you and your work, you can’t expect someone else to pay you for the music you create unless they have deep pockets and don’t mind taking a risk on you.  After all, no one can guarantee they’ll have a hit record using your music or anyone else’s. “

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